New scientist dating service

From the beginning of 1961 "The" was dropped from the title. Since its first issue, New Scientist has written about the applications of science, through its coverage of technology.

new scientist dating service-11new scientist dating service-79new scientist dating service-50

They wanted to know what would happen in a world where instead of vetting potential dates by their artfully posed selfies or carefully crafted dating-site profiles, we looked at data gathered by their computers and phones.As use of data-gathering devices increases, it’s a world that’s just round the corner. “There’s a bit of a mismatch between a data led view of the world – which is very dry and mechanical – and how we view ourselves,” says Chris Elsden, who headed up the project.A readers' letters section discusses recent articles, and discussions also take place on the website.Readers contribute observations on examples of pseudoscience to Feedback, and offer questions and answers on scientific and technical topics to Last Word; extracts from the latter have been compiled into several books.Elsden and his colleagues want to explore other ways we can use data that gets collected as we go about our modern lives.

“Can we give people more control over it, make it more ambiguous or playful?

For that final inspiration injection, read our photo comic about Linda's DNA dating adventure.

Will the siren call of genetic compatibility triumph over Linda and Nic's love?

ONE Saturday night last year, 11 people went looking for love.

Like countless speed daters before them, they met in a room draped with curtains, the lights on low.

All's fair in love and war, so we've gathered the latest scientific weapons of love to help you win the battle for romance.