Government programs consolidating debt

Income-driven repayment plans – like Income-Based Repayment, Pay As You Earn, and Revised Pay As You Earn – cap your federal student loan payments at a percentage of your income.For many borrowers, these plans can help make monthly payments more manageable.

To enter IBR, you have to have enough debt relative to your income to qualify for a reduced payment.

That means it would take more than 15% of whatever you earn above In some situations, your reduced payment under IBR may not cover the interest on your loans.

As you weigh the pros and cons, keep in mind that timing is critical.

With just a few exceptions, you get only one chance to consolidate with the government loan programs.

For more information about the DRT outage, see our previous blog posts: borrowers with federal Direct student loans have access to a new repayment plan with monthly payments capped at 10% of your discretionary income. If you’re having trouble affording your monthly payments – or just want the assurance of payments based on your income – check out the Revised Pay As You Earn (REPAYE) plan and see if it’s right for you.

Income-driven repayment plans can help keep monthly payments affordable based on your income and family size.

Once the introductory period expires, the rate you’ll see on a balance transfer card is usually higher than on a personal loan.

You’ll also have to avoid the temptation of making further charges during that time. Fixed payments ensure that you’ll pay off debt on a set schedule.

Direct consolidation loans are now the only type of federal student consolidation loan.

Under the Direct Loan Consolidation Program, you can consolidate Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Supplemental Loans for Students (SLSs), Federally Insured Student Loans (FISLs), PLUS Loans, Direct Loans, Perkins Loans, Health Education Assistance Loans (HEALs), and just about any other type of federal student loan.

If you work in government or at a nonprofit organization, you might qualify for For the first time since it was taken down due to security concerns in March, millions of student loan borrowers can once again use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool (DRT) to electronically transfer their tax information into the online application for income-driven repayment (IDR) plans.